Major Tracks

The department offers two different major tracks. The major track in Russian/East European/Eurasian Languages and Cultures offers an interdisciplinary “area studies” approach. For this major track, divided into Russian or East European/Eurasian concentrations, two years of language study (or the equivalent) are required. The major track in Russian Language and Literature focuses specifically on Russian language and literature. It requires three years of language coursework (or the equivalent).

An overall grade-point average of 2.0 in upper-division courses applied to the major program is required. All courses fulfilling major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

The Slavic Department’s majors are flexible: we take into account individual students’ academic interests, prior exposure to the area, and knowledge of its languages. We welcome double majors.

These major tracks are updated as of November 2017.

Major Track in Russian/East European/ Eurasian Languages and Cultures

This major track integrates the study of languages and cultures of a large area: Russia, East Central Europe, Southeastern Europe, and Eurasia. Students design their own programs by selecting courses offered by the Slavic and other departments and programs, such as Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Global Studies, History, Journalism, Legal Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies. While all majors in this track will gain knowledge of the whole area, the program also allows each student to concentrate on a particular language and culture. Students are advised to see the Undergraduate Advisor in advance to prepare an individualized study plan.

Languages regularly offered by our department that can be used for this track are: Russian, Armenian, BCS (Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian), Czech, Hungarian and Polish.

Students may declare the major after the completion of two semesters of a language (or equivalent) and one lower division course, Slavic 50.

The Department highly recommends additional exposure to language through coursework, intensive summer language programs, or the Education Abroad Program.

Concentration in Russian:

 

Lower-division (23 units):

  • Four semesters of Russian (Russian 1, 2, 3, 4) or the equivalent as determined by examination.
    Students with prior knowledge of the languages should consult the Major Advisor for language testing and placement. 20 units.
  • Slavic 50: Introduction to Russian/East European/Eurasian Cultures. (With permission of the Major Advisor, it may be possible to substitute another lower-division course, e.g. Slavic 39, 45, or 46). 3 units.

Upper-division (25-31 units):

  • Slavic 100 (Seminar: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Cultures). 3 units.
  • One literature/culture course, to be chosen from the Slavic 130, 140, or 150 series. 4 units.
  • Six courses chosen from the upper-division courses offered by the Slavic Department, or area-relevant courses from other departments and programs, such as Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Global Studies, History, Journalism, Legal Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. 18-24 units.
    • Select from Slavic 130, 140, 150, 160, 170 or Armenian 120 series
    • Up to two of these six courses can be replaced by Slavic 100L (readings in the original language) or Slavic 100R (research). 1 unit each.
    • With permission of the Major Advisor, up to two upper-division language courses may be counted among electives.

Concentration in Armenian, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Czech, Hungarian, or Polish:

 

Lower-division (11 units):

  • 2 semesters of introductory language or equivalent, as determined by examination. 8 units.
    Armenian 1A-B
    BCS 27A-B
    Czech 26A-B
    Hungarian 1A-B
    Polish 25A-B
    Students with prior knowledge of the language should see the Undergraduate Advisor for language testing and placement.
  • Slavic 50: Introduction to Russian/East European/Eurasian Cultures. (With permission of the Major Advisor, it may be possible to substitute another lower-division course, e.g. Slavic 39, 45, or 46). 3 units.

Upper-division (25-31 units):

  • 2 semesters of continuing language or equivalent. 8 units
    Armenian 101A-B
    BCS 117A-B
    Czech 116A-B
    Hungarian 100
    Polish 115A-B
    Students with prior knowledge of the language should see the Undergraduate Advisor for language testing and placement.
  • Slavic 100 (Seminar: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Cultures). 3 units
  • Five courses chosen from the upper-division courses offered by the Slavic Department or area-relevant courses from other departments and programs, such as Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Global Studies, History, Journalism, Legal Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. 14-20 units
    • Select from Slavic 130, 140, 150, 160, 170 or Armenian 120 series
    • Up to two of these five courses can be replaced by  Slavic 100L (readings in the original language) or Slavic 100R (research). 1 unit each.

Major Track in Russian Language and Literature

This major track focuses on the study of Russian language, literature, and culture. Students are advised to see the Undergraduate Advisor in advance to prepare an individualized study plan.

Students may declare the major after the completion of two semesters of Russian (or equivalent) and either Slavic 45 or 46.

REQUIREMENTS:

Lower-division (28 units):

  • Four semesters of Russian (Russian 1, 2, 3, 4) or the equivalent as determined by examination. Students with prior knowledge of the languages should consult the Major Advisor for language testing and placement. 20 units.
  • A two-semester survey of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature. 8 units.
    Slavic 45 (Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature)
    Slavic 46 (Twentieth-Century Russian Literature)

Upper-division (25-31 units):

  • Slavic 100 (Seminar: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Cultures). 3 units
  • Two semesters of Advanced Russian language. 8 units.
    Russian 103A
    Russian 103B
    Students with prior knowledge of Russian may substitute specialized courses, such as Russian 102 (Readings in Specialized Russian), Russian 105 (Advanced Translation), Russian 120 (Advanced Russian Conversation and Communication).
  • One course on literature and culture with readings in Russian. 4 units
    Slavic 180, 181, 182, 188, or 190
  • Two courses on Russian literature and culture in English translation. 8 units
    Slavic 130-140 series.
  • Two courses chosen from the upper-division courses in Russian literature and culture offered by the Slavic Department or area-relevant courses from other departments and programs, such as Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Global Studies, History, Journalism, Legal Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. 8 units
    Slavic 130-140 series

    • Up to 2 courses can be replaced by  Slavic 100L (readings in the original language) or Slavic 100R (research). 1 unit each.