logo

Home > People > Faculty

The profiles of permanent faculty and lecturers which follow describe main academic and research interests and give lists of selected publications. They are updated yearly. Listings are divided into two groups: core faculty and lecturers, and are alphabetized within each group. Emeriti professors, who are listed separately, have retired from full-time teaching, but are actively involved in research; many continue to consult students. Distinguished scholars from the international community (Russia, Europe, America) are regularly invited as visiting professors and visiting scholars. For more information, contact the Department or individual faculty members. (We apologize for the absence of diacritical marks: a technical difficulty.)


RONELLE ALEXANDER, Professor
ralex@berkeley.edu
http://www.bcsgrammarandtextbook.org/Grammar/author.shtml

Ph.D. Harvard University (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Teaching: South Slavic languages (Bulgarian, Macedonian, BCS [Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian]); literatures of the former Yugoslavia; Yugoslav cultural history; South Slavic linguistics; Balkan folkore; East Slavic folklore. Recent graduate seminars include Balkan linguistics, South Slavic sociolinguistics, Slavic folklore theory.

Research interests: Balkan Slavic (especially Bulgarian) dialectology; language and ethnicity in the Balkans; the language of South Slavic oral epic; Balkan linguistics and language contact.

Current projects: (1) “Bulgarian Dialectology as Living Tradition”, a compendium of field recordings made over two decades keyed for analysis both of linguistic features and cultural content; (2) Continuing analysis of recordings made in the 1930s of South Slavic epic singers, with the goal of contrasting spoken language and sung language; (3) Continuing analysis of the language situation in the former Yugoslavia.

Selected publications:

Linguistics

  • What Is Second Position Anyway? BCS Clitics Revisited (A Linguist’s Linguist, Studies in South Slavic Linguistics, ed. S. Franks et al.). 2009.
  • Rhythmic Structure Constituents and Clitic Placement in Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian (American Contributions to the XIV International Congress of Slavists), 2008.
  • Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian: A Grammar with Sociolinguistic Commentary. 2006.
  • Serbo-Croatian Dialectology Revisited (Harvard Ukrainian Studies 28). 2006.
  • Dialectology (Slavic Linguistics 2000: The Future of Slavic Linguistics in America). 2006
    http://www.seelrc.org/glossos/issues/8/alexander.pdf
  • Revitalizing Bulgarian Dialectology, ed. UCIAS Digital publications, 2004.
    http://escholarship.org/uc/item/9hc6x8hp
  • "The Scope of Double Accent" (in Revitalizing Bulgarian Dialectology).
  • "Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, One Language or Three?" International Journal of Slavic Linguistics and Poetics 44-45 (2002-03).
  • "Bridging the Descriptive Chasm, the Bulgarian Generalized Past". In Of All the Slavs my Favorites..., ed. H. Aronson and V. Friedman (2001).
  • In Honor of Diversity, the Linguistic Riches of the Balkans. OSU Slavic Department, 2000.
  • "Tracking Sprachbund Boundaries, Word Order in the Balkans". Studies in Slavic and General Linguistics 28 (2000).
  • Intensive Bulgarian, A Textbook and Reference Grammar (2 vols.), 2000.
  • "The Balkanization of Wackernagel's Law. Indiana Slavic Studies 7 (1995).
  • ""Remarks on the Evolution of South Slavic Prosodic Systems." American Contributions to the Eleventh International Congress of Slavists, ed. A. Timberlake, v. I, 1993.
  • "Directions of Morphophonemic Change in Balkan Slavic, the Accentuation of the Present Tense." In American Contributions to the Ninth International Congress of Slavists. Slavica, 1983.
  • "Torlak Accentuation. Slavistische Beitraege 94. Munich: Otto Sagner, 1975.

Folklore/Literature

  • Vasko Popa and the Stargazer’s Legacy. (Puzzles of Language, ed. E. Taylan & B. Rona). 2011.
  • Vasko Popa’s Opus (Twentieth Century Literary Criticism 167). 2006.
  • Narrative Voice and Listener’s Choice in the Prose of Ivo Andric (Ivo Andric Revisited, ed. W. Vucinich). 1996.
  • The ‘Tension of Essences’ in South Slavic Epic. (O Rus! Studia litteraria slavica in honorem Hugh McLean, ed. S. Karlinsky et al.). 1995.
  • The Poetics of Vuk Karadižic’s Kosovo Songs: An Analysis of Kosovka Djevojka (Kosovo, Legacy of a Medieval Battle, ed. T. Emmert). 1991.
  • Poetika Njegoševa jezika i jezik njegove poezije [The Poetry of Njegoš’s Language and the Language of his Poetry] (Naucni sastanak slavista u Vukove dane 18/2). 1990.
  • The Structure of Vasko Popa’s Poetry (UCLA Slavic Studies 14). 1985.

back to top


DAVID FRICK, Professor
(Affiliated with Department of History)
frick@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Yale University (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Teaching: Polish literature (all periods); advanced Polish language; history of Poland (including literary language); Old Church Slavic; Medieval Orthodox Slavic texts; history of Eastern Europe. Recent graduate seminars have included: History of Cities; Early Modern East-Central Europe.

Research interests: Orthodox Slavic Reform in the Ukraine and Belorussia in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Polish sacred philology in the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation. Textual criticism and cultural polemics in Muscovy in the 17th century. Poland-Lithuania in the Age of Confessionalization. Enlightenment Poland. Cities. Vilnius/Wilno.

Current projects: A translation of the Polish letters of Fryderyk Chopin; an edition, in English translation and with extensive commentary, of primary sources for a history of Protestant, Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Uniate reform movements in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Informational Links:
Staropolska
Old Polish Literature
Mikolaj Rej
Polonistica on the Internet

Selected publications:

Books

  • Polish Sacred Philology in the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation: Chapters in the History of the Controversies (1551–1632). University of California Publications in Modern Philology 123. Berkeley, 1989.
  • Meletij Smotryc´kyj. Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute Publications. Cambridge, Mass., 1995.
  • Wilnianie. Zywoty siedemnastowieczne. Bibliotheca Europae Orientalis. Warsaw, 2007.
  • Rus´ Restored: Selected Writings of Meletij Smotryc´kyj (1610–1630). Harvard Library of Early Ukrainian Literature. English Translations, Volume 7. Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2005.
  • Kith, Kin, and Neighbors: Communities and Confessions in Seventeenth-Century Wilno. Cornell University Press: Ithaca, 2013.

Edited Book

  • Litauen und Ruthenien/Lithuania and Ruthenia. Studien zu einer transkulturellen Kommunikationsregion (15.–18. Jahrhundert/Studies of a Transcultural Communication Zone (15th–18th Centuries), Forschungen zur osteuropäischen Geschichte 71. Wiesbaden, 2007. (Co-edited with Stefan Rohdewald and Stefan Wiederkehr, with an introduction by the three editors—“Transkulturelle Kommunikation im Großfürstentum Litauen und in den östlichen Gebieten der polnischen Krone: Zur Einleitung,” pp. 7–33.)

Literary Translations

  • Jerzy Pilch, A Thousand Peaceful Cities (a translation of Jerzy Pilch, Tysiac spokojnych miast, London, 1997), Rochester, NY, 2010.
  • Jerzy Pilch, My First Suicide (a translation of Jerzy Pilch, Moje pierwsze samobójstwo, Warsaw, 2006), forthcoming, Rochester, NY, 2011.
  • Fryderyk Chopin, Korespondencja (a translation of the Polish letters of the composer for the Warsaw Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopina), in progress.

Articles

  • "Szymon Budny and Sacred Philology: Between East and West." Commentary to: Biblia Slavica, Serie II: Polnische Bibeln, Band 3, Budny: Teil 2, Kommentar, Paderborn, 1994.
  • " 'Foolish Rus' '": On Polish Civilization, Ruthenian Self-Hatred, and Kasijan Sakovyc; Harvard Ukrainian Studies 18 (1994).
  • "The Uses of Authority and the Authority of Use (Philological Praise and Blame in Early Modern Rus')." Harvard Ukrainian Studies 18 (1994).
  • "Sailing to Byzantium: Greek Texts and the Establishment of Authority in Early Modern Muscovy." Harvard Ukrainian Studies 19 (1995).
  • "Franklin's Free Will; Or, Optimism in Cracow, 1798." Austrian History Yearbook 28 (1997).
  • "Misrepresentations, Misunderstandings, and Silences (Problems of Seventeenth-Century Ruthenian and Muscovite Cultural History)." In Religion and Culture in Early Modern Russia and Ukraine, eds. Samuel H. Baron and Nancy Shields Kollmann, DeKalb, Illinois, 1997.
  • "The Brest Bible of 1563: Translators, Sponsors, Readers." Commentary to: Biblia Slavica, Serie II: Polnische Bibeln, Band 2, Brester Bible: Teil 2, Kommentar, Paderborn, 2001.
  • "Lazar' Baranovyc: The Union of Lech and Rus." In Culture, Nations, and Identity: The Ukrainian-Russian Encounter, 1600-1945, eds. Andreas Kappeler, Zenon E. Kohut, Frank E. Sysyn, and Mark Von Hagen, Edmonton and Toronto, 2002.
  • "Slowa uszczypliwe, slowa nieuczciwe: The Language of Litigation and the Ruthenian Polemic." In Xrusai Pulai, Zlataja Vrata: Essays Presented to Ihor Sevcenko on His Eightieth Birthday by His Colleagues and Students. Ed. Peter Schreiner and Olga Strakhov. Palaeoslavica 10 (2002), Vol. 1.
  • "The Bells of Vilnius: Keeping Time in a City of Many Calendars." In Making Contact: Maps, Identity, and Travel, eds. Lesley Cormack, Natalia Pylypiuk, Glenn Berger, and Jonathan Hart, Edmonton, Alberta, 2003.
  • "The Councilor and the Baker's Wife: Ruthenians and Their Language in Seventeenth-Century Vilnius." In Speculum Slaviae Orientalis: Ruthenia, Muscovy and Lithuania in the Late Middle Ages. UCLA Slavic Studies, n.s., IV. Moscow, 2005, pp. 34-65.
  • "Jews and Others in Seventeenth-Century Wilno: Life in the Neighborhood." Jewish Studies Quarterly 12 (2005): 8-42.
  • "Aethiopem dealbare difficile, Wilkiem orac trudno: The Adagia of a Seventeenth-Century Ruthenian Polemicist." In Slavia Orthodoxa and Slavia Romana: Essays Presented to Riccardo Picchio by His Students on the Occasion of his Eightieth Birthday, September 7, 2003, ed. Harvey Goldblatt, Krasimir Stanchev, and Giorgio Ziffer. Yale Russian and East European Publications 15. New Haven, 2006, pp. 95-124.
  • "Since All Remain Subject to Chance." Poor Relief in Seventeenth-Century Wilno. Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 55 (2006): 1-55.
  • "Buchner at the Font: Godparenting and Network Building in Seventeenth-Century Wilno." In Politics and Reformations: Communities, Politics, Nations, and Empires. Essays in Honor of Thomas A. Brady, Jr. Eds. Christopher Ocker, Michael Printy, Peter Starenko, Peter Wallace. Leiden, 2007, pp. 205–27.
  • "Jews in Public Places: Chapters in the Jewish-Christian Encounter in Seventeenth-Century Wilno." Polin 22(2010):215–48.
  • "Libellus chamorum: protestancka elita mieszczanska a szlachta w siedemnastowiecznym Wilnie." In Litwa w epoce Wazów. Prace ofiarowane Henrykowi Wisnerowi w siedemdziesiata rocznice urodzin. Eds. Wojciech Kriegseisen and Andrzej Rachuba. Warsaw, 2006, pp. 239–55.
  • "Separation, Divorce, Bigamy: Stories of the Breakdown of Marriage in Seventeenth-Century Wilno." In Litauen und Ruthenien/Lithuania and Ruthenia. Studien zu einer transkulturellen Kommunikationsregion (15.–18. Jahrhundert/Studies of a Transcultural Communication Zone (15th–18th Centuries) Forschungen zur osteuropäischen Geschichte 71. Wiesbaden, 2007, pp. 111–36.
  • "Pochwalki na zdrowie, slowa uszczypliwe, zle a zapamietale przedsiewziete umysly. Obelgi starowilenskie ad honorem Durani." In Amoenitates vel lepores philologiae. Eds. Roman Laskowski and Roman Mazurkiewicz. Cracow, 2007, pp. 96–107.
  • " 'Ruski czlowiek': Muscovites and Ruthenian Identity in Occupied Wilno, 1655–1661." In Tentorum Honorum: Essays Presented to Frank E. Sysyn on His Sixtieth Birthday, Journal of Ukrainian Studies 2008–2009(33–34):134–60.
  • "Turris Babel Vilnensis: Speaking, Writing, Ethnolinguistic Stereotyping." In Die Europäizität der Slawia oder die Slawizität Europas. Ein Beitrag der kultur- und sprachrelativistischen Linguistik. Eds. Christian Voß and Alicja Nagórko. Studies on Language and Culture in Central and Eastern Europe, vol. 2. Munich, 2009, pp. 91–123.
  • " 'According to the Confession in Which I Die': Taking the Measure of Allegiances in Seventeenth-Century Wilno." Central Europe, vol. 8, no. 2 (2010):107–22.
  • "Five Confessions in One City: Multiconfessionalism in Early Modern Wilno." In Thomas Max Safley, ed., A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World, Brill’s Companions to the Christian Traditions 28, Leiden, 2011, pp. 417–44.

back to top


LUBA GOLBURT, Associate Professor
lgolburt@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Stanford University (Comparative Literature)

Teaching: 18th- and 19th-century Russian and European literature; the novel, the short story; 19th-century lyric; history and fiction, visual culture; Romanticism, Realism; Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy; Stylistics.

Research interests: Russian literature and culture of the 18th and 19th centuries; Romanticism and Realism; German Idealism in Russia; 19th-century visual experience; history and genre; Derzhavin, Pushkin, Turgenev; institutions of culture; fashion; cultural polemics in Russia, France and England; translation and ideology; the history of literary history.

Current projects: The First Epoch: The Eighteenth Century and the Russian Historical Imagination (forthcoming from the University of Wisconsin Press, 2014)

“Pushkin,” commissioned for The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism, ed. Paul Hamilton

Selected Publications:

Articles

  • "The Queen is Dead, Long Live the King: Paul's Accession and the Plasticity of Late Eighteenth-Century Panegyric," forthcoming in a special issue of Russian Literature (Winter 2014), ed. Joachim Klein
  • "The Portrait Mode: Zhukovskii, Pushkin and the Gallery of 1812"
    In Rites of Place: Public Commemoration and Celebration in Russia, eds. Julie Buckler and Emily Johnson. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013
  • "Catherine’s Retinue: Fashion, Aging, and Historicism in the Nineteenth Century" Slavic Review 70:4 (Winter 2009); thematic cluster, "Copies: The Mimetic Component of Remembering," guest editors Monika Greenleaf and Luba Golburt
  • "Copies: The Mimetic Component of Remembering. Introduction"
    with Monika Greenleaf, Slavic Review 70:4 (Winter 2009)
  • "Derzhavin's Ruins and the Birth of Historical Elegy." Slavic Review, Winter 2006; thematic cluster, "Ruins in Russian Culture," ed. Andreas Schonle.
  • "O chem svidetel'stvuiut pamiatniki?" In Istoria i povestvovanie/History and Narration, ed. Gennadi Obatnin, Moscow: Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2006.
  • "Derzhavin's Monuments: Sculpture, Poetry, and the Materiality of History." Toronto Slavic Quarterly 13, Summer 2005. http://www.utoronto.ca/tsq/13/golburt13.shtml
    Reprinted with permission in Nineteenth-Century Literature Criticism, Vol. 215, Kathy Darrow, ed. (Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2009)

back to top


DARYA KAVITSKAYA , Assistant Professor
dkavitskaya@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley (2001)
B.A. in Linguistics and in Slavic Languages and Literatures, UC Berkeley (1995)

Teaching: Slavic and General Linguistics

Research interests: Phonetics/phonology: specifically, the mental representation of sound systems, and how phonological theory can inform us about the nature of the language faculty and the fundamental human cognitive capacity for language.
Phonological theory: Syllable structure, palatalization, sonority, phonotactics; opacity; contrast; vowel harmony.
Historical Slavic linguistics and morpho-phonology.
Field linguistics: Slavic (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech), Turkic (Crimean Tatar), Uralic (Tundra Nenets), Georgian;
describing endangered languages.
Language acquisition and language disorders (Specific Language Impairment, or SLI)

http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~dkavitskaya/#

Previous appointments: Department of Linguistics, Yale University (2001-2011)

Current project: The Grammar of Northern Crimean Tatar.
Experimental and Theoretical Investigations in the Phonology of Tundra Nenets.
Vowel harmony and vowel deletion: the case of Crimean Tatar.
The history of de-palatalization in Slavic: Articulatory motivations for a diachronic change.

Selected Publications:

Books

Crimean Tatar. LINCOM Europa, 2010.

Compensatory Lengthening: Phonetics, Phonology, Diachrony. Routledge, New York & London, 2002.

Selected articles

Investigating the effects of phonological memory and syllable complexity in Russian-speaking children with SLI. Journal of Child Language. (2011). [with M. Babyonyshev, T. Walls, and E. Grigorenko].

Syllable structure and Specific Language Impairment: a case of Russian-speaking children. In Chuck Cairns & Eric Raimy, eds. Handbook of the Syllable. Brill Publishers. 353–371. (2011). [with M. Babyonyshev]

The interaction between contrast, prosody, and coarticulation in structuring phonetic variability. Journal of Phonetics 38: 625–639 (2010). [with K. Iskarous].

When an interaction is both opaque and transparent: the paradox of fed counterfeeding. Phonology 27: 1–34 (2010). [with P. Staroverov].

Trills and palatalization: Consequences for sound change. In Jodi Reich, Maria Babyonyshev & Darya Kavitskaya, eds. Proceedings of the Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 17. Ann Arbor: Michigan Slavic Publications. 2009, 97–110. [with K. Iskarous, A. Noiray, and M. Proctor].

Perceptual salience and palatalization in Russian. In Louis Goldstein, D. H. Whalen, and C. T. Best, eds. Laboratory Phonology 8. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin. 2006, 589–610.

Pitch accent and the phonologization of vowel length in Slavic. In Steven Franks, Frank Y. Gladley and Mila Tasseva-Kurktchieva, eds. Formal Approaches to Slavic Linguistics 13. Ann Arbor: Michigan Slavic Publications, 2005.

Hittite vowel epenthesis and the sonority hierarchy. Diachronica 28: 267–299 (2001).

Tense and aspect in Lai Chin. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area. 20: 173–213 (1997).

Fieldwork:
2009 Crimea, Ukraine. The Grammar of Crimean Tatar.
2009 Nel’min Nos, Russia. Tundra Nenets Phonetics and Phonology.
2005 Nel’min Nos, Russia. Participation in the Moscow State University Nenets linguistic expedition. The investigation of Tundra Nenets Phonology.
2004 Nel’min Nos, Russia. Participation in the Moscow State University Nenets linguistic expedition. The investigation of Tundra Nenets Phonology.
2003 Crimea, Ukraine. Three dialects of Crimean Tatar.
2002 Crimea, Ukraine. Dialectal Variation and Change in Crimean Tatar.
1998 Republic of Georgia. Syllabification in Georgian.

back to top


ELLEN R. LANGER, Lecturer
erlanger@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Teaching: Czech language, literature and culture.

Research interests: Norm and variation in Slavic. Czech language and culture. Nineteenth- century Russian literature. Russian women writers. Historical linguistics. Language pedagogy of heritage and less commonly taught languages.

Current projects: Course materials for Czech language instruction, continuing development of elementary reading curriculum. Grammatical variation as a literary device in Anna Karenina. Instrumental singular variation in nineteenth-century Russian prose.

back to top


LISA LITTLE, Lecturer
lclittle@berkeley.edu

M.A. University of Texas (Slavic Linguistics).

Teaching: Advanced Russian conversation; advanced Russian for graduate students. Teaching methodology. Pre-service workshop and training program for Graduate Student Instructors. Coordinator of Russian undergraduate language program (Slavic 1 through Slavic 4).

Research interests & current projects: Development of instructional materials for Russian language courses.

Selected Publications:

  • Speak Russian! Fushille and Little. U.T. Press, 1990.

back to top


SANTOUKHT MIKAELIAN, Lecturer, Armenian language
santoukht@berkeley.edu

I was born and grew up in Aleppo, Syria, in an Armenian family and
attended Armenian schools. I graduated from the American University of
Beirut, Lebanon, and did graduate work at State University of New York at
Stony Brook, Cleveland State University and Californian State University
East Bay. I’ve taught English Language Development and English as a Second
Language for over 20 years. I’ve been teaching Armenian Language at UC
Berkeley since fall 2005.

back to top


ANNA MUZA, Continuing Lecturer
amuza@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Russian Academy of Performing Arts (theory and history of dramatic art).

Teaching: Russian language; Russian language and culture for heritage speakers; Russian-English/English Russian translation; performing arts, theatre, and drama in Russia; Chekhov. Advanced readings in Russian literature (in the original).

Research interests: Language and culture in language pedagogy; heritage learners. Theory and practice of translation. Performing arts: drama, theater, and visual culture; Chekhovin the English-speaking world.

Current projects: Chekhov’s costumes of self: rereading Chekhovfor his 150th anniversary. Performing arts in language learning.

Selected publications:

  • " 'The Tragedy of a Russian Woman': Anna Karenina in the Moscow Art Theatre, 1937" in: Russian Literature, vol. 65, issue 4, 2009.
  • "The Sound of Distant Thunder: Chekhov and Chekhovian Subtexts in Tom Stoppard’s Russian Trilogy" – In: Chekhov the Immigrant. Translating the Cultural Icon. Eds. Michael Finke, Julie de Sherbinin. Slavica, 2008.
  • "Chekhov v Avstralii" – In: Literaturnoe nasledstvo, tom 100: Chekhov i mirovaia literatura, v trekh knigax. Kn. 2, Moskva, Nauka, 2005.
  • The White Quadrangle. Kazimir Malevich’s Writings on Film. Ed. Oksana Bulgakowa. In English and Russian. Berlin and San Francisco: Potemkin Press, 2002. – Annotations (with Oksana Bulgakowa). Translations. Essay "Weaving Texts: Malevich’s Uses of Language."
  • "Kornei Chukovskii and 'Men and Books of the 1860s' in the 1920s." -- forthcoming in Forgotten Episodes of Soviet Literary History, ed. N. Luker, Astra Press, Nottingham, England.
  • "Science, Philosophy, Music: Chekhov's Three Germans." In: Cold Fusion, ed. G. Barabtarlo, Berghahn Books, New York & Oxford, 2000.
  • "Meyerhold at Rehearsal. New Materials on Meyerhold's Work with Actors." Theatre Topics, vol. 6, No.1, 1996.
  • "Chukovskii and the Nabokovs." The Nabokovian, No. 36, Spring 1996.
  • "Reading the Soviet Bukvar'". Almanac Mesto Pechati, No.1, 1993, Moscow.

back to top


ERIC NAIMAN, Professor
(Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Department of Comparative Literature)
naiman@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages & Literatures)

J.D. Yale Law School

Teaching: 19th and 20th Century Russian Literature. Nabokov. Dostoevsky and Modernism. Early Soviet Culture. Literature and Ideology. The Body in Russian Culture. Recent graduate seminars have included: The Gothic Novel; The Master and Margarita; Andrei Platonov; Mikhail Bakhtin.

Research interests: Early Soviet Culture. Russian Law and Society. Gender Studies. Andrei Platonov. History of Soviet Medicine. Vladimir Nabokov.

Current projects: Andrei Platonov. Vladimir Nabokov. Soviet subjectivity. Bulgakov's Master and Margarita, Fiction of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, "University Fictions".

Selected publications:

Books

  • Nabokov, Perversely (Cornell University Press, 2010).
  • co-edited, with Christina Kiaer, Everyday Life in Revolutionary Russia: Taking the Revolution Inside (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006).
  • co-edited, with Evgeny Dobrenko, The Landscape of Stalinism: The Art and Ideology of Soviet Space (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2003).
  • Sex in Public: The Incarnation of Early Soviet Ideology. (Princeton University Press, 1997).

Articles

  • "Their Mutual Friend: On the Trail of the Woman Who Introduced Dickens to Dostoevsky," The Times Literary Supplement, April 12, 2013, 16-21. Link to online version http://www.the-tls.co.uk/tls/public/article1243205.ece
  • "Hermophobia: On Sexual Orientation and Reading Nabokov," Representations, 2008, no.101, 116-43.
  • "Children in The Master and Margarita," Slavic and East European Journal, Winter 2006, vol.50, no.4, 655-75.
  • "A Filthy Look at Shakespeare's Lolita," Comparative Literature, Winter 2006, vol. 58, no. 1, 1-23.
  • "Perversion in Pnin (Reading Nabokov Preposterously)," Nabokov Studies, 7 (2002/2003).
  • "'Introduction' to Andrey Platonov, Happy Moscow, trans. by Robert Chandler. (London: Harvill Press, 2001).
  • "V zhopu prorubit' okno: seksual'naia patologiia kak ideologicheskii kalambur u Andreia Platonova," Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 32, 1998.
  • "Shklovsky's Dog and Mulvey's Pleasure: The Secret Life of Defamiliarization," Comparative Literature, vol.50, no.4 (1998).
  • "When a Communist Writes Gothic: Aleksandra Kollontai and the Politics of Disgust," Signs, vol. 22, no. 1, 1996.
  • "Historectomies: The Metaphysics of Reproduction in a Utopian Age," in Sexuality and the Body in Russian Culture, ed. J. Costlow, S. Sandler and J. Vowles (Stanford Univeristy Press, 1993).
  • "Of Crime, Utopia and Repressive Complements: The Further Adventures of the Ridiculous Man." Slavic Review, 50 (1991).

back to top


ANNE NESBET, Associate Professor
(Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Program in Film Studies)
nesbet@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Comparative Literature).
D.E.A. Universite de Paris - III (General & Comparative Literature).

Teaching: Russian and Soviet Literature; Russian and Soviet Film; ; Literature for Children; Eisenstein; the Novel in Russia and the West; Literary Theory; Film Theory; Russia and America; Gogol; The Soviet Union and American Minority Movements. Recent graduate seminars have included: Literature of the 1920s; Film: Eisenstein; Film: Vertov. Literature for Children.

Research interests: Silent and Early Sound Film (France, Germany, Russia). Early Soviet Culture. Sergei Eisenstein. Soviet Film. GDR History and Culture.

Current projects: Soviet Cinema and the Construction of Architectural Space

Selected publications:

Books

  • The Cabinet of Earths and A Box of Gargoyles (Harper Collins, 2012 and 2013): novels for children and young adults
  • Savage Junctures: Sergei Eisenstein and the Shape of Thinking (London: I.B. Tauris, 2003).

Articles

  • "Skyscrapers, Consular Territory, and Hell: What Bulgakov and Eizenshtein Learned about Space from Il'f and Petrov's America," Slavic Review 69: 2 (2010)
  • “Ecstasy in the Margins: How Bely’s Gogol Helped Eisenstein Build His House,” forthcoming in The Russian Review , 2005.
  • “In Borrowed Balloons: The Wizard of Oz and the History of Soviet Aviation,” Slavic and East European Journal, Vol. 45, No. 1, 2001.
  • "Sergei Eisenstein and the 'Juncture of Beginning and End,'" in Eisenstein at 100, (Rutgers Unversity Press, 2001).
  • "Inanimations: Snow White and Ivan the Terrible," Film Quarterly, vol. 50, no 4, 1997.
  • "Coming Home to Homer: Gogol's Odyssey," Slavic and East European Journal, Vol. 39, No. 3, 1995.
  • "Formy vremeni v <>: Khronosomy khronotopa," (written jointly with Eric Naiman), Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2, 1993.
  • "Mise en abime: Platonov, Zolia i poetika truda," (written jointly with Eric Naiman), Revue des Etudes Slaves, vol. 64, No. 4, 1992.
  • "Suicide as Literary Fact in the 1920s," Slavic Review, Vol. 50, No. 4, 1991.
  • "Tokens of Elective Affinity: The Uses of Goethe in Mandel'stam," Slavic and East European Journal, Vol. 32, No. 1, 1988.

back to top


IRINA PAPERNO, Professor
(Also affiliated with Department of History)
ipaperno@berkeley.edu

M.A. (Russian language and literature) Tartu University.
M.A. (Psychology) Stanford University.
Ph.D. (Slavic languages and literatures) Stanford University.

Teaching: Nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature. Russian and European intellectual and cultural history. The European Novel. Literary/cultural theories. Discourse analysis and analysis of text.

Research interests: Narrative and consciousness; personal documents (memoirs, diaries, letters); dreams; psychoanalysis and literature; conceptions of the self and subjectivity; history of experience; the novel.

Other interests: Psychoanalysis; community mental health.

Current projects: Lev Tolstoy and the narrative of self.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Stories of the Soviet Experience: Memoirs, Diaries, Dreams. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2009.
  • Intimacy and History: The Herzen Family Drama Reconsidered, Russian Literature 61: 1-2 (Special Issue), ed. Irina Paperno, (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03043479
  • Suicide as a Cultural Institution in Dostoevsky's Russia. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1997. Russian translation: Samoubiistvo kak kul'turnyi institut. Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 1999; Chinese translation: Jilin: Jilin People's Publishing House, 2003.
  • Chernyshevsky and the Age of Realism: A Study in the Semiotics of Behavior. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988. Russian translation: Semiotika povedeniia: Nikolai Chernyshevsky -chelovek epokhi realizma. Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 1996.
  • Creating Life: The Aesthetic Utopia of Russian Modernism, co-edited with Joan Delaney Grossman. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994
  • Christianity and the Eastern Slavs: Russian Culture in Modern Times. Co-edited with Irina Paperno. University of California Press, 1994.

Articles

  • "Leo Tolstoy's Correspondence with Nikolai Strakhov: The Dialogue on Faith," in Anniversary Essays on Tolstoy, ed. Donna Tussing Orwin (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2010).
  • "Dreams of Terror: Dreams from Stalinist Russia as a Historical Source," Kritika: Exploration in Russian and Eurasian History, vol. 7, no. 4 (Fall 2006), pp. 793-824.
  • "What Can Be Done with Diaries?" The Russian Review 63: 4 (October 2004).
  • "Personal Accounts of the Soviet Experience," Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, vol. 3, no. 4 (Fall 2002).
  • "Exhuming the Bodies of Soviet Terror," Representations 75 (Summer 2001).
  • "Tolstoy's Diaries: The Inaccessible Self," in Laura Engelstein and Stephanie Sandler, Self and Story in Russian History (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000). Translated into German: Individualitaetskonzepte in der russischen Kultur, ed. Christa Ebert (Berlin: Berlin Verlag Arno Spitz, 2002). Translated into Russian: Novoe literturnoe obozrenie, 61 (2003).
  • "On the Nature of the Word: Theological Sources of Mandelshtam's Dialogue with the Symbolists." In Christianity and the Eastern Slavs. Volume 2, edited by Robert P. Hughes and Irina Paperno (Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1994).
  • "Pushkin v zhizni cheloveka Serebrianogo veka." In Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism: From the Golden Age to the Silver Age, ed. by Boris Gasparov, Robert P. Hughes and Irina Paperno. Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1992. Reprinted in: Sovremennoe amerikanskoe pushkinovedenie. Sbornik statei. St. Petersburg, 1999.
  • "How Nabokov's Gift Is Made." In Festschrift in Honor of Joseph Frank. Ed. by Edward J. Brown, Lazar Fleishman, Gregory Freidin and Richard Schupbach. (Stanford: Stanford Slavic Studies, 1992). Translated into Russian: Vladimir Nabokov: Pro et contra, ed. B. Averin, M. Malikova. St. Petersburg: Izdatel'stvo RHGI, 1997.

back to top


HARSHA RAM, Associate Professor
(Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of Comparative Literature, also affiliated with the Department of Italian Studies)
ram@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. , Yale University (Comparative Literature).
M.Phil, Yale University (Comparative Literature).
B.A. Honours, University of Sydney (Italian).
B.A. Honours, University of New South Wales (Russian)

Research and teaching interests:
Russian and comparative European romanticism and modernism
The Russian and European avant-garde
Russian, European, Near Eastern and South Asian poetic traditions
Italian literature
Indian literature
Georgian literature and history
Theories of world literature
Literary theory, comparative poetics, genre theory, and literary history
Comparative modernisms and modernities; vernacular and high culture
Cultural and political history of Russia-Eurasia and the Caucasus
Postcolonial studies; theories of nationalism, imperialism and cosmopolitanism

Current book projects:
Crossroads Modernity. Aesthetic Modernism and the Russian-Georgian Encounter

Poetry and Power: The Futurist Avant-garde in Russia and Italy

Selected publications:

Books

  • The Imperial Sublime: A Russian Poetics of Empire. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2003.

Articles

Forthcoming:

  • "Spatializing the Sign: The Futurist Eurasianism of Roman Jakobson and Velimir Khlebnikov." Facets of Eurasianism. Eds. Marlène Laruelle, Sergey Glebov and Mark Bassin
  • "Introducing Georgian Modernism;" "Decadent Nationalism, 'Peripheral' Modernism: The Georgian Literary Manifesto between Symbolism and the Avant-garde," Cluster on Georgian Modernism including two manifestos by P'aolo Iashvili and T'itsian T'abidze, translated by Shota Papava and Harsha Ram, annotated by Harsha Ram. Modernism/Modernity (January 2014)

Published:

  • "Futurist Geographies: Centre, Periphery, and the Struggle for
    Aesthetic Autonomy: Paris, Italy, Russia, 1909-1914." The Oxford Handbook of Global Modernisms. Ed. Mark Wollaeger. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012), 313-340.
  • "Russian Modernism." The Cambridge Companion to European Modernism. Ed. Pericles Lewis (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 113-135.
  • "Masks of the Poet, Myths of the People: The Performance of Individuality and Nationhood in Georgian and Russian Modernism." Slavic Review 67, no.3 (Fall 2008), 567-590.
  • " 'Vam' (1909): Interpreting an early lyric by Velimir Khlebnikov."
    Sankirtos, Studies in Russian and Eastern European Literature,
    Society and Culture in Honor of Tomas Venclova
    . Eds. Robert Bird,
    Lazar Fleishman and Fedor Poljakov, Frankfurt: Peter Lang
    Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften (2008): 77-93.
  • "The Sonnet and the Mukhambazi: Genre Wars on the Edges of the
    Russian Empire," Remapping Genres. PMLA 122/5 (October 2007):
    1548-1570.
  • "Towards a Crosscultural Poetics of the Contact Zone: Romantic, Modernist and Soviet Intertextualities in Boris Pasternak's translations of T'itsian T'abidze." Comparative Literature 59/1 (Winter 2007): 63-89.
  • "From 'Petersburg' to 'Petrograd': The Creative History of a Georgian Lyric Poem and its Russian Recreation by Boris Pasternak." Eternity's Hostage. Selected Papers from the Stanford International Conference on Boris Pasternak, May 2004. Ed. Lazar Fleishman. Stanford Slavic Studies, 31:1, Part 2 (2006): 356-374.
  • "Between 1917 and 1947: Postcoloniality and Russia-Eurasia," Forum: Conference Debate, "Are We Postcolonial? Post-Soviet Space." PMLA 121: 3 (May 2006), 831-833.
  • "Andrei Belyi and Georgia: Georgian Modernism and the Reception of the 'Petersburg text' in Peripheral Space." Russian Literature, 58 (2005): 243-276.
  • "Pushkin and the Caucasus," The Pushkin Handbook, ed. David M. Bethea, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, (2005): 379-402.
  • “Modernism on the Periphery. Literary Life in Postrevolutionary Tbilisi.” Review Essay of two books by Tat’iana Nikol’skaia. Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 5,2 (Spring 2004)
  • “Romantic Topography and the Dilemma of Empire: The Caucasus in the Dialogue of Georgian and Russian Poetry.” Coauthored with Zaza Shatirishvili, Russian Review, 63 (January 2004).
  • “Velimir Chlebnikov’s ‘Odinokij licedej’.” Die Welt der Slaven, 46 (2001).
  • “Imagining Eurasia: The Poetics and Ideology of Olzhas Suleimenov's AZ i IA.” Slavic Review 60, no.2 (Summer, 2001).
  • “The Poetics of Eurasia: Velimir Khlebnikov between Empire and Revolution.” Social Identities in Revolutionary Russia, ed. Madhavan K.Palat. Basingstoke: Palgrave Publishers, 2001.
  • “Prisoners of the Caucasus: Literary Myths and Media Representations of the Chechen Conflict”. Berkeley Program in Soviet and post-Soviet Studies Working Papers Series,1999 http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~bsp/publications.htm
  • “Kavkazskie plenniki: Kul'turnye mify i medial'nye reprezentatsii v chechenskom konflikte.” Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 34 (1998).
  • “Russian Poetry and the Imperial Sublime.”Russian Subjects: Empire, Nation and the Culture of the Golden Age, ed. Monika Greenleaf and Stephen Moeller Sally. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1998.

back to top

VISITING FACULTY

Polina Barskova, Hampshire College; Visiting Professor, Fall 2013
pbHA@hampshire.edu

back to top

LECTURERS

MILUTIN JANJIC, Lecturer, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language
milutinus@yahoo.com

SUZAN NEGIP-SCHATT, Lecturer, Romanian language
snschatt@berkeley.edu

EVA SOOS SZOKE, Lecturer, Hungarian language
eszoke@berkeley.edu

KATARZYNA ZACHA, Lecturer, Polish language
kzacha66@berkeley.edu

back to top

EMERITI

Emeriti professors, who are listed below, have retired from full-time teaching; many are actively involved in the program and some emeriti faculty are available for consultations and as members of the Ph.D. examinations and dissertation committees. Emeriti faculty are actively involved in research.

ARKADY ALEXEEV, Lecturer
arkadyalexeev@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Dr. Alexeev has retired, but continues to teach one course.

Teaching: Advanced Russian; practical Russian Phonetics; Russian-English-Russian Translation; Business Russian. Director of second-year intensive Russian summer program.

Research interests: Development of instructional materials for Russian language courses. Slavic linguistics; synchronic, historical and comparative semantics; lexicology. Russian and European history. Translation.

Current projects: Reader on poetic translation; reader "Business Russian." Textbook/reader "Techniques of Russian-English, English-Russian Translation." The novel on the life of the Marquis de Lafayette.

Publications:

  • Textbook/reader "Practical Russian Phonetics."
  • Translation of "Lay of Prince Igor's Host" into English in unrhymed verse (forthcoming).
  • Historical novel: The Adventures of Giulio Mazarini. Book One. Author House, 2004; Book Two, Fultus, 2004. Books Three and Four, forthcoming.

back to top


OLGA ASTROMOFF, Senior Lecturer Emerita
olgaabez@aol.com

M.A. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

back to top


JOAN GROSSMAN, Professor Emerita
grossman@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Harvard University (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Research interests: Russian symbolism and decadence viewed especially as a cultural process. General interests: questions of literary evolution; Russian modernism.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Ivan Konevskoi. "Wise Child" of Russian Symbolism. Joan Delaney Grossman. Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2010.
  • William James in Russian Culture. Eds. Joan Delaney Grossman and Ruth Rischin. Rowman & Littlefield/ Lexington Books, 2003.
  • Creating Life: The Aesthetic Utopia of Russian Modernism, edited with Irina Paperno. Stanford University Press, 1994.
  • Valery Bryusov and the Riddle of Russian Decadence. University of California Press, 1985.
  • The Diary of Valery Bryusov (1893-1905). Edited, translated, with introductory essay. University of California Press, 1980.
  • Edgar Allan Poe in Russia: A Study in Legend and Literary Influence. Wurzburg: JAL-Verlag, 1973 (Russian translation, St. Petersburg, 1998).

Articles

  • “Variations on the Theme of Pushkin in Pasternak and Brjusov." In: Boris Pasternak and His Times. Ed. Lazar Fleishman. Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1989.
  • "Words, Idle Words: Discourse and Communication in Anna Karenina." In Tolstoy: Essays in Interpretation. Ed. Hugh McLean. University of California Press, 1989.
  • "Transformations of Time in Turgenev's Poetic." Literature, Culture, and Society in the Modern Age. In Honor of Joseph Frank. Eds. Edward J. Brown et. al. Stanford Slavic Studies, 1991.
  • "Moi Pushkin. Briusov's Search for the Real Aleksandr Sergeevich." Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism. Eds Boris Gasparov, Robert P. Hughes, and Irina Paperno. University of California Press, 1992.
  • "Ivan Konevskoi: Bogatyr of Russian Symbolism." The Silver Age in Russian Literature. Ed. John D. Elsworth. Macmillan, 1992.
  • "Alternate Beliefs: Spiritualism and Pantheism Among the Early Modernists," Christianity and the Eastern Slavs, vol. III: Russian Literature in Modern Times, eds. Boris Gasparov et al., University of California Press.
  • "Valery Bryusov and Nina Petrovskaia: Clashing Models of Life in Art," in Creating Life: The Aesthetic Utopia of Russian Modernism, eds. Irina Paperno, Joan Delaney Grossman, Stanford University Press, 1994.
  • "Neo-Kantianism, Pantheism, and the Ego. Symbolist Debates in the 1890's," in Studies in East European Thought, December 1995.
  • "Rise and decline of the 'literary' journal: 1880-1917," in Literary Journals in Imperial Russia. Ed. Deborah A. Martinsen, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
  • "Ivan Konevskoi's Metaphysical Journey to Finland," in Studia Slavica Finlandensia, XVI/2, Helsinki, 1999.
  • “From the Finland Station: Ivan Konevskoi,” in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. Eds. Karen L. Ryan and Barry Scherr. St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
  • “The Transformation Myth in Russian Modernism: Ivan Konevskoi and Nikolai Zabolotskii,” in Metamorphoses in Russian Modernism. Ed. Peter I. Barta. Central European University Press, 2000.
  • “Philosophers, Decadents, and Mystics: James’s Russian Readers in the 1890s,” in William James in Russian Culture. Eds. Joan Delaney Grossman and Ruth Rischin, Rowman & Littlefield/ Lexington Books, 2003.
  • “Briusov and the Healing Art: Northern Nature in ‘Na granitakh,” The Russian Review, 62: 1 (2003).

back to top


ROBERT P. HUGHES, Professor Emeritus
rph@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Research interests: Modern Russian poetry; Symbolism (Solov'ev, Belyi, Blok) and post-Symbolism (Mandel'shtam, Akhmatova, Pasternak, Khodasevich); Brodskii; twentieth-century experimental prose; Nabokov; Russian emigre culture; Pushkin.

Current project. Khodasevich's studies of Pushkin and his period (3 volumes, Berkeley); Collected works of V.F. Khodasevich (8 volumes, Moscow); Remizov’s epistolary circle.

Selected publications:

Books

  • V.F. Khodasevich, Pushkin i poety ego vremeni, vol. III. Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialties, forthcoming.
  • Vladislav Khodasevich, Sobranie sochinenii v vos'mi tomakh. Tom 2. Kritiki i publitsistika, 1905-1927. Co-edited with John Malmstad. Moscow: "Russkii put'", 2010.
  • Vladislav Khodasevich, Sobranie sochinenii v vos'mi tomakh. T. 1. Polnoe sobranie stikhotvorenii. Co-edited with John Malmstad. Moscow: "Russkii put'", 2009.
  • V.F. Khodasevich, Pushkin i poety ego vremeni, vol. II. Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 2001.
  • V.F. Khodasevich, Pushkin i poety ego vremeni, vol. I. Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1999.
  • Russkii Berlin, 1921-1923. Co-edited with Lazar Fleishman and Olga R. Hughes. Paris: YMCA, 1983; second edition: Moscow, 2003.
  • Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism: from the Golden Age to the Silver Age. Co-edited with Boris Gasparov and Irina Paperno. University of California Press, 1991.
  • Christianity and the Eastern Slavs: Russian Culture in Modern Times. Co-edited with Irina Paperno. University of California Press, 1994.
  • Vladislav Khodasevich, Stat'i i retsenzii (1905-1926). [Vol. 2 of the collected works of Khodasevic in five volumes.] Co-edited, commentary, with John Malmstad. Ardis, 1989.
  • Vladislav Khodasevich, Sobranie sochinenii: Stikhotvoreniia. [Vol. 1 of the collected works of Khodasevich in five volumes.] Co-edited, introductions and commentary with John Malmstad. Ardis, 1983.

Articles

  • "Zametki Khodasevicha o ‘Kamennom goste'", Paraboly. Studies in Russian Modernist Literature and Culture. In Honor of John E. Malmstad. Wien: Peter Lang, 2011.
  • "Khodasevich-kritik", Vladislav Khodasevich, Sobranie sochinenii v vos’mi tomakh. T. 2. Moscow, 2010. Pp. 3-20.
  • "…iz etogo nichego, krome ryb'ego khvosta, i ne moglo poluchit'sia”. Razgovor Z.N. Gippius i P.P. Suvchinskogo", Vademecum. K 65-letiiu Lazaria Fleishmana. Moscow: Vodolei, 2010. Pp. 340- 353.
  • "Iz pisem P.P. Suvchinskogo k A.M. Remizovu 1920-x godov", Na rubezhe dvukh stoletii. Sbornik v chest’ 60-letiia A.V. Lavrova. Moscow: NLO, 2009. Pp. 759-770.
  • "Pushkin and Russia Abroad" in The Cambridge Companion to Pushkin. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • "Brodskij, Mandel’shtam, and an Elegaic Epitaph," Telling Forms. 30 Essays in Honour of Peter Alberg Jensen. (Stockholm, 2004).
  • "'… s Vami beda - ne perevesti' (Pis'ma D.P. Sviatopolka-Mirskogo k A.M. Remizovu. 1922-1929)," Diaspora V. Novye materialy (Paris-St. Petersburg, 2003).
  • "V.F. Khodasevich: Pis'ma k M.A. Tsiavlovskomu", Russkaia literatura, No. 2, 1999.
  • "Khodasevich: Oda russkomu chetyrekhstopnomu iambu," in Blokovskii sbornik, XIII (Tartu, 1996).
  • "Duel in the Snow" [on Robin Edmonds' Pushkin (New York, 1995)]. The New York Times Book Review, December 17, 1995.
  • "Russia's Cassandra, Russia's Antigone," [on Roberta Reeder's Anna Akhmatova: Poet and Prophet (New York, 1994)]. The New York Times Book Review, January 1, 1995.
  • "Some Reflections on Khodasevich's Ode to the Russian Iambic Tetrameter," in: O Rus! [Festschrift for Hugh McLean]. Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1995.
  • "Khodasevich in Venice," in For SK. In Celebration of the Life and Career of Simon Karlinsky. Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1994.
  • "Poems With a Heroine" [recent translations of Anna Akhmatova]. The Washington Post Book World, XXIII/7 (April 25, 1993).
  • "Poets without '-isms' -- Cvetaeva and Chodasevich." Marina Tsvetaeva.. Bern, 1992.
  • "Pushkin in Petrograd, February 1921." In Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism.
  • "Nabokov Reading Pasternak." Pasternak and His Times. Berkeley, 1989.
  • "Andrei Belyi i Vladislav Khodasevich: k istorii otnoshenii." Vestnik russkogo khristianskogo dvizheniia. Paris, 1988 [With first publication of Khodasevich's "Moskovskaia simfoniia."]
  • "Vladislav Khodasevich /Wladyslaw Chodasiewicz and Polish Romanticism." Language. Literature. Linguistics. Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1986.
  • "Vladislav Khodasevich to Mikhail Karpovich: Six Letters (1923-1932)." Co-edited with John Malmstad. Oxford Slavonic Papers, 19 (1986).

back to top


OLGA RAEVSKY HUGHES, Professor Emerita
orhughes@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Research interests: Centered on the literature and culture of the 20th century, specifically: 1) in-depth study of works of Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, and Remizov, with attention to their autobiographical prose; 2) history and literature of Russian emigration, with emphasis on the period between the wars; 3) Russian literary developments and cultural life of the early 20th century.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Vstrecha s emigratsiei. Iz perepiski Ivanova-Razumnika 1942-1945 godov. [An Encounter with the Emigration. From the Correspondence of Ivanov-Razumnik with Emigre Writers. (1942-1946)] Publication, introductory article, editing and annotating. (In Russian). Paris: YMCA Press; Moscow: Russkii Put’, 2001.
  • Russkii Berlin, 1921-1923. Co-edited with Lazar Fleishman and Robert P. Hughes. Paris: YMCA, 1983, 2nd ed: Paris: YMCA-Press - Moskow: Russkii put', 2003.
  • Aleksej Remizov, Iveren'. [Collected, edited and annotated Iveren', Aleksej Remizov's late book of autobiographical prose.] Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1986.
  • The Poetic World of Boris Pasternak. Princeton University Press, 1974

Articles

  • "Aleksei Remizov's Defense of the Russian Language." Language, Literature, Linguistics. Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialies, 1987.
  • "Volshebnaja skazka v knige A. Remizova Iveren'. Aleksej Remizov. Approaches to a Protean Writer. Vol. 16. UCLA Slavic Studies. Los Angeles: Slavica, 1987.
  • "O samoubiistve Vladimira Maiakovskogo v 'Okhrannoi gramote' Borisa Pasternaka." Boris Pasternak and His Times. Berkeley: Berkeley Slavic Specialties, 1989.
  • "Alexey Remizov's Later Autobiographical Prose." Autobiographical Statements in Twentieth Century Russian Literature. Princeton University Press, 1990.
  • "Liturgicheskoe vremia i Evkharistiia v romane Pasternaka Doktor Zhivago," Christianity and the Eastern Slavs, III. Russian Literature in Modern Times. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.
  • "Ivanov-Razumnik v 1942 godu", Russkaia kul'tura 20-go veka: Metropolia i diaspora. Blokovskii sbornik, 13. Tartu, 1996.
  • "L'action chretienne des etudiants russes et son Messager. Orthodoxie et culture," La Russie en devenir. En hommage a Nikita Struve. Paris: Institut d'etudes slaves, 2002.
  • "Rozhdestvenskaia zvezda B. Pasternaka (Neskol'ko nabliudenii)". Telling Forms. Thirty Essays in Honour of Peter Alberg Jensen. Stockholm, 2004.

back to top


OLGA MATICH, Professor Emerita
omatich@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. UCLA (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Professor Matich has retired but remains actively involved in teaching and mentoring graduate students.

Teaching: Nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and culture (Dostoevsky, Modernism, Soviet society and culture, contemporary Russian literature), literature and the visual arts. Recent graduate seminars have included: Russian Modernism; Literature and Other Arts; The City in Literature.

Research interests: Russian Modernism (Andrei Bely); post-Stalin and émigré literature and culture; literature and the visual arts (representation of clouds); gender; decadence and degeneration theory; history of disgust and negative emotions; modern city in literature and culture.

Current projects: A memoir about my émigré family, whose life was defined by the Russian revolution, and about interesting people I have known in Russia, for instance writers, and here. It is a hybrid text that combines life writing and historical scholarship, including archival scholarship related to family members, and consists of fragmentary narratives that explore point of view and personal cultural identity.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Petersburg/Petersburg: Novel and City 1900 – 1921 (editor; author of Part I), Wisconsin University Press, 2010. Related website: Mapping Petersburg. The website maps the material, political, and artistic culture of Petersburg at the beginning of the 20th century. Both book and related website are the product of a collaborative project with a group of current and former Berkeley graduate students in Russian literature and Russian history.
  • Erotic Utopia: The Decadent Imagination in the Russian Fin-de-Siecle. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2004. Russian translation to appear in 2008 (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie).
  • Laboratory of Dreams: Russian Avant-garde and Cultural Experiment (co-edited with John Bowlt), Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.
  • The Third Wave: Russian Literature in Emigration, editor. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Ardis, 1984.
  • Paradox in the Religious Poetry of Zinaida Gippius. Munich: Fink Verlag, 1972.

Articles

  • "K istorii oblaka: Vasilii Kandinsky, Andrei Bely i drugie," Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 210, 2011.
  • "Nevsky Prospekt, 28: Shveinaia mashina, shveia, povestvovanie," Teoriia mody: Odezhda, telo, kul’tura, 14, 2009-2010, pp. 71-96.
  • "Poetics of Disgust: To Eat and Die in Andrei Belyi’s Petersburg," Slavic Review (Sp. topic: “Emotional Turn? Feelings in Russian History and Culture), 68/2, 2009.
  • "Russkaia emigratsiia v Kalifornii," Na rubezhe dvukh stoletii. Sbornik v chest’ 60-letiia Aleksandra Vasil'evicha Lavrova, eds. Vsevolod Bagno, John Malmstad & Mariia Malikova (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2009)
  • "Cernyševskij's What Is To Be Done? Transgressive Vision and Narrative Omniscience," International Journal of Slavic Linguistics and Poetics, 44-5, 2006.
  • "Mobster Gravestones in 1990s Russia," Global Crime, 7/1, 2006.
  • "Backs, Suddenlys, and Surveillance in Andrej Belyj's Petersburg," Russian Literature (Special Issue: Andrej Bely - On the Occasion of His 125th Birthday), LVIII-I/II, 2005.
  • "Eduard Limonovs Poetik der Verärgerung," Zurück aus der Zukunft: Osteuropäische Kulturen im Zeitalter des Postkommunismus (eds. Boris Groys, Anne von der Heiden & Peter Weibel), Frankfurt: Suhrkamp Verlag, 2005.
  • "The White Emigration Goes Hollywood," Russian Review, 64/2, 2005.
  • "Three Russian Dancers: Art Nouveau, Decadence, Degeneration," Experiment (sp. issue on Performing Arts and the Avant-Garde), 10, 2004.
  • "Pokrovy Salomei: Eros, Smert' i istoriia," Erotizm bez beregov (ed. M.V. Pavlova), Moscow, Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2004, pp. 90-121.
  • "Russkie v Gollivude/Gollivud o Rossii" [Russians in Hollywood/Hollywood on Russia], Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 54, 2002.
  • "What is a Russian Harem?," In the Realm of Slavic Philology: To Honor the Teaching Scholarship of Dean S. Worth (eds. John Dingley and Leon Ferder). Bloomington: Slavic, 2000.
  • "Gender Trouble in the Amazonian Kingdom: Turn-of-the-Century Representations of Women in Russia," Amazons of the Avant-Garde (eds. John E. Bowlt and Matthew Drutt), New York: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 1999.
  • "Doctor Zhivago: Voyeurism and Shadow Play as Narrative Perspective," Die Welt der Slaven, 44, 1999.
  • "Uspeshnyi mafiozo - mertvyi mafiozo: kul’tura pogrebal’nogo obriada" [A Successful Mafioso Is a Dead Mafioso: A Cultural Study of Burial Practices], Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 33, 1998.
  • "Remaking the Bed: Utopia in Daily Life," Laboratory of Dreams: The Russian Avant-Garde and Cultural Experiment, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.
  • "Diaspora kak ostranenie: Russkaia literatura v emigratsii," Russian Studies 2.2 (1996).
  • " 'Rassechenie trupov' i 'sryvanie pokrovov' kak kul'turnye metafory" [Dissection and Unveiling as Cultural Metaphors], Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 6, 1994.
  • "The Symbolist Meaning of Love: Theory and Practice," Creating Life: The Aesthetic Utopia of Russian Modernism, (eds. Irina Paperno and Joan Grossman), Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • "Cultural Return: The Personal Myth of Zinaida Gippius." Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism: From the Golden Age to the Silver Age. (eds. B. Gasparov and R. Hughes), University of California Press, 1991.

back to top


HUGH McLEAN, Professor
hmclean@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Harvard University (Slavic Languages and Literatures).

Research interests: Mainly prose fiction of the 19th century (Gogol, Tolstoy, Kushchevskij, Leskov, Chekhov), with occasional forays in the 20th century (Zoshchenko), and poetry (Majakovskij).

Selected publications:

Books

  • Nikolai Leskov: The Man and His Art. Harvard University Press, 1977.
  • In the Shade of the Giant: Essays on Tolstoy. [A volume of essays on Tolstoy edited by Hugh McLean, with contributions from his students and colleagues. McLean's contribution is entitled, "Truth in Dying."] California Slavic Studies 13. University of California Press, 1989.

Articles

  • "Gogol's Retreat From Love: Toward an Interpretation of Mirgorod." American Contributions to the Fourth International Congress of Slavists, Moscow, 1958. Mouton and Co., 1958. Rpt. Russian Literature and Psychoanalysis, ed. Daniel Rancour-Laferrier (Amsterdam, 1989).
  • "Walls and Wire: Notes on the Prison Theme in Russian Literature." International Journal of Slavic Linguistics and Poetics, 25-26 (1983).
  • "A Linguist Among the Poets." In International Journal of Slavic Linguistics and Poetics, 27 (1983). [Supplement entitled Roman Jakobson: What He Taught Us. Edited by Morris Halle.]
  • "Majakovskij's 'How to Make Verses' and Jakobson's Theory of Verse." Language, Poetry, and Poetics: The Generation of the 1890s: Jakobson, Trubetzkoy, Majakovskij. Edited by Krystyna Pomorska et. al., 1987.
  • "Negation of the Negation: Or, Remote Control in Nikolaj Negorev." In Language, Literature, Linguistics. Editors Michael S. Flier and Simon Karlinsky. Berkeley, 1987.
  • "Tolstoy and Jesus," Christianity and the Eastern Slavs, II, ed. Robert P. Hughes and Irina Paperno (U.C. Press, 1995).
  • "The Case of the Missing Mothers, or, When Does a Beginning Begin," For SK. In Celebration of the Life and Career of Simon Karlinsky, ed. Robert P. Hughes and Michael Flier), 1996.
  • "Rousseau's God and Tolstoy's," Tolstoi Studies Journal, 1998.
  • "The Countryside in the Russian Novel," In Cambridge Companion to the Russian Novel, ed. Malcolm Jones and Robin Feuer Miller, 1998.
  • "Hemingway and Tolstoy: A Pugilistic Encounter," Tolstoy Studies Journal, 1999.
  • "Jakobson's Metaphor/Metonymy Polarity: A Retrospective Glance." In Roman Jakobson: Teksty, dokumenty, issledovanija (Moscow, 1999).
  • "Roman Jakobson Repatriated," Slavonica, 1996-97
  • "Which English Anna?" Tolstoy Studies Journal, 2001.
  • "Resurrection," in Donna Tussing Orwin, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy (Cambridge, 2002)
  • "A Clash of Utopias: Tolstoy and Gorky," Tolstoy Studies Journal, 2002
  • "Afterword," in Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych and Other Stories. Signet Classics, 2003
  • "Pamfil Chekhov: Whose Son?" Bulletin of the North American Chekhov Society, 2003.
  • "Foxes into Hedgehogs: Berlin and Tolstoy," in The Cultural Gradient: The Transmission of Ideas in Europe, 1789-1991, ed. Catherine Evtuhov and Stephen Kotkin, 2003.
  • "Introduction," in Leo Tolstoy, Master and Man and Other Stories. Penguin Classics, 2004.
  • "Could the Master Err? A Note on 'God Sees the Truth but Waits'," Tolstoy Studies Journal, 2004.
  • "Nikolai Leskov," in Histoire de la litterature russe. Le XIXe siecle, le temps du roman, 2005.
  • "A Woman's Place...The Young Tolstoy and the Woman Question," in Word, Music, History: A Festschrift for Caryl Emerson, ed. Lazar Fleishman et al, 2005.
  • Ed., with Lazar Fleishman, A Century's Perspective: Essays on Russian Literature in Honor of Olga Raevsky Hughes and Robert P. Hughes, 2005.
  • "Buried as a Writer and as a Man: The Puzzle of Family Happiness," in A Century's Perspective, 2005.
  • "Anthony Briggs's Translation of War and Peace" (review article), Tolstoy Studies Journal, 2006.
  • "Claws on the Behind: Tolstoy and Darwin," Tolstoy Studies Journal, 2007 (forthcoming).

back to top


JOHANNA NICHOLS, Professor Emerita of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Affiliate Professor Emerita of Linguistics, Professor of the Graduate School
johanna@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley (Linguistics).

Professor Nichols has retired but remains actively involved in teaching and mentoring graduate students.

Teaching: All aspects of Slavic linguistics; historical linguistics, typology, languages of the Caucasus, languages and peoples of Eurasia.

Research interests: Slavic historical linguistics, Slavic morphosyntax. Historical linguistics; typology; linguistic geography and areal linguistics; computational phylogeny. Languages of the Caucasus; languages of the Eurasian steppe.

Current projects: : Transitivity, reflexivization, and aspect in Slavic. Prefixation and valence in Slavic languages. Slavic phylogeny and the spread of late Proto-Slavic. Chechen and Ingush fieldwork (grammar, text collections); Nakh-Daghestanian reconstruction. Language spreads. Books in progress: Languages of the Caucasus; Language Spreads (with Richard Rhodes).

Selected publications:

Books

  • Ingush Grammar. University of California Publications in Linguistics. Late summer 2011.
  • Chechen-English and English-Chechen Dictionary. London: Routledge, 2004.
  • Ingush-English and English-Ingush Dictionary. London: Routledge, 2004.
  • Linguistic Diversity in Space and Time. University of Chicago Press, 1992.
  • Predicate Nominals: A Partial Surface Syntax of Russian. University of California Publications in Linguistics, 1981.

Articles

  • The evolution of Slavic. Matthias Fritz and Jared Klein, eds., Comparative Indo-European Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, in press.
  • Forerunners to globalization: The Eurasian steppe and its periphery. Cornelius Hasselblatt, Peter Houtzagers, and Remco van Pareren, eds., Language Contact in Times of Globalization, 177-195. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2011.
  • Indeterminate motion verbs are denominal. New Approaches to Slavic Verbs of Motion, eds. Viktoria Hasko and Renee Perelmutter, 47-65. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 2010.
  • Proving Dene-Yeniseian genealogical relatedness. James Kari and Ben A. Potter, eds., The Dene-Yeniseian Connection. Anthropological Papers of the University of Alaska Vol. 5 (New Series):1-2.299-309, 2010.
  • Linguistic complexity: A comprehensive definition and survey. Geoffrey Sampson, ed., Language Complexity as an Evolving Variable, 110-125. Oxford University Press, 2009.
  • Gabriela Caballero, Michael J. Houser, Nicole Marcus, Teresa McFarland, Anne Pycha, Maziar Toosarvandani, Suzanne Wilhite, Johanna Nichols. Nonsyntactic ordering effects in noun incorporation. Linguistic Typology 12:3.383-421 (2008)
  • Language spread rates as indicators of glacial-age peopling of the Americas. Current Anthropology 49:6.1109-1117 plus supporting online material (2008).
  • A typological geography for Proto-Indo-European. In Karlene Jones-Bley, Martin E. Huld, Angela Della Volpe, and Miriam Robbins Dexter, eds., Proceedings of the 18th Annual UCLA Indo-European Conference, 191-211. Washington, DC: Institute for the Study of Man (2007)

back to top


WALTER SCHAMSCHULA, Professor Emeritus
prague@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. University of Frankfurt (Slavic Philology).

Research interests: Influences of cultural contacts on Czech literatures, especially Germanic; movement and migration of literary themes and topics in Europe; Czech cultural history; Czech theory of literature; theory and practice of translation; completion of history of Czech literature (in German and English).

Current projects: Czech medieval texts: Old Czech drama, satire, poetry and its connections with medieval Latin and German literatures; the Russian historical novel. The relationship of oral and written epic poetry in Slavic literatures; the imag eof the rhapsode/bard/guslar in early narrative.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Geschichte der tschechischen Literatur, Vol. I: Von den Anfaengen bis zur nationalen Wiedergeburt. Cologne - Vienna, 1989.
    Vol. II: Von der Romantik bis zum Ersten Weltkrieg. Cologne - Vienna, 1996.
    Vol. III: Von der Gruendung der republik bis zur Gegenwart. Cologne-Vienne-Weimer, 2004.
  • Die Anfaenge der tschechischen Erneuerung und das deutsche Geistesleben (1740-1800). Munich, 1973.
  • Der russische historische Roman vom Klassizismus bis zur Romantik (Diss.). Osteuropastudien der Hochschulen des Landes Hessen, Reihe III, Frankfurter Abhandlungen zur Slavistik, Bd. 3. Meisenheim/Glan 1961.
  • Jaroslav Hasek 1883-1983. Proceedings of the International Hasek Symposion Bamberg, June 25-28, 1983. [West Slavic Contributions - Westslavische Beiträge vol. 1] Frankfurt - Bern - New York, 1989.
  • An Anthology of Czech Literature, 1st Period: From the Beginnings Till 1410. [West Slavic Contributions, vol. 2] Frankfurt - Bern - New York, 1991.
  • An Anthology of Czech Literature, 2nd Period: The Age of Religious Discord (1410-1740) [West Slavic Contributions, vol. 3] Frankfurt - Bern - New York, 1997.
  • Adam Mickiewicz, Die Ahnenfeier (Dziady). (Bilingual Polish and German), Cologne - Weimar - Vienna, 1991.
  • Juliusz Slowacki, Koenig Geist (Krol - Duch). (German annotated transation) [West Slavic Contributions, vol. 4]. Frankfurt - Bern - New York, 1997.

back to top


ALAN TIMBERLAKE, Professor Emeritus
(Affiliated with Department of Lingistics)
timberlake@berkeley.edu

Ph.D. Harvard University (Linguistics)

Since his retirement in 2008, Professor Timberlake has been teaching at Columbia University. He continues to advise graduate students who began working under his supervision.

Teaching: Synchronic and historical Slavic and Russian linguistics; Slavic culture; Czech literature

Research interests: Descriptive grammar of Russian; chronicles.

Selected publications:

Books

  • Russian Reference Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004

Articles

  • "Hierarchies in the Genitive of Negation." Slavic and East European Journal 19 (1975).
  • "Isochrony in Late Common Slavic," Robert A. Maquire and Alan Timberlake [eds.] American Contributions to the Eleventh International Congress of Slavists. Bratislava, August-September 1993. Literature. Linguistics. Poetics. Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1993.
  • "Russian," Bernard Comrie and Greville Corbett [eds.], The Slavonic Languages, London-New York: Routledge, 1993.
  • "Avvakum's Aorists," Russian Linguistics, 19, 1995.
  • "Older and Younger Recensions of the First Novgorod Chronicle," Oxford Slavonic Papers, 33:135, 2000.

back to top


List of names and email addresses of faculty, lecturers, graduate students and staff

ON THIS PAGE:

Core Faculty

Visiting Faculty

Lecturers

Emeriti

In Memoriam

  home
  people
  events
  about

Design: Renee Perelmutter, 2004. Updated by Elizabeth LaVarge-Baptista, 11/22/13